Posted in Tudor Medicine

Henry VIII’s near to death experience…

During a bout of jousting on 24th January 1536, Henry VIII fell from his horse, Smashing to the ground with the fully armour plated horse landing on top of him. Henry lay unconscious and ‘Without speech,’ for two hours.

The impact that the consequent injuries had on his personality, his life and his government are often debated. Henry was a powerful man who was in constant and insufferable pain. His accident, clearly made him very aware of his own mortality and led to unprecedented changes in his life.

If the King had of died on that January day he would have left his kingdom in chaos. Not only because of his lack of a male heir but because Princess Elizabeth was a baby, his first daughter, Lady Mary, had been made illegitimate and his present Queen was the most unpopular woman in the country.

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Posted in Anne Boleyn, Breaking News..., From around the web

A new image of Anne Boleyn that has been hiding in plain sight for years…

I had a good look at this image in the early hours of this morning and I noticed that the medallion does not show the usual ‘AB’ or ‘A’ initials. But instead, had the initials ‘AR, instead. Anne was a queen consort and not a queen regnant wasn’t she?

Well no. Anne was the only queen consort to be crowned with Saint Edwards crown (Which is reserved solely for the ruling monarch.) Making her a monarch too and means she was able to use the Initials ‘AR.’ Henry never crowned another queen after Anne died.

Link to the original site with lots of information:

http://tudorfaces.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/anne-boleyn-as-lady-of-garter.html?spref=fb

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Posted in Tudor Medicine

Tudor cure for Smallpox Demons…

 

It is thought that only about 10% of all Tudors lived to be beyond their 40th birthdays and one of the reasons was the poor standard of Tudor medicine and medical knowledge.

Smallpox was a highly contagious, potentially disfiguring and deadly disease. There was no cure and no effective treatment.

Henry VIII contracted smallpox, as did his forth wife Anne of Cleaves but his daughter Elizabeth I was the family member to become seriously ill with the disease. In 1562 her doctors thought that she would die. Fear gripped her people because Elizabeth was unmarried and had no heirs. The queen was lucky and  she survived with only a few pockmark scars. The ‘cure’ was thought to be caused by ‘the red treatment’ which was administered to the queen  by being wrapped in a red blanket and placed by a fire.

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